Uhuru Muigai Kenyatta Biography and Profile, President of Kenya
Follow Goodreadbiography.com Here: YouTube Channel, YouTube RSS, Pinterest, Twitter, Tumblr, Flickr, Plurk, Flipboard, RSS.

Uhuru Kenyatta Biography

Bio Synopsis

Uhuru Muigai Kenyatta (Uhuru Kenyatta), born October 1961, two years before Kenya officially got independence from Britain, his parents named him “Uhuru” — Swahili for freedom — in anticipation of the nation’s liberation from colonial rule. Here’s Uhuru Muigai Kenyatta Biography and Profile. Read more


Horoscope: Scorpio

Uhuru Muigai Kenyatta Early Life

Uhuru Kenyatta (Uhuru Muigai Kenyatta) was born on 26 October 1961. Kenya’s Deputy Prime Minister Uhuru Kenyatta is the son of Kenya’s first president, Jomo Kenyatta, and heir to some of the largest land holdings in Kenya. He owns at least 500,000 acres of prime land spread across the country. The land was acquired by his father in the 1960s and 1970s when the British colonial government and the World Bank funded a settlement transfer fund scheme that enabled government officials and wealthy Kenyans to acquire land from the British at very low prices. Uhuru and his family also own Brookside Dairies, Kenya’s largest dairy company, as well as stakes in popular television station K24 and a commercial bank in Nairobi, among other interests. Two years after his father died in 1978, Kenyatta joined Amherst College in Massachusetts, where he studied economics and political science. He returned home after graduation and launched a horticulture business, which he later sold, and focused on the extensive family businesses his father left behind. His family’s empire includes hundreds of thousands of acres of land, often a cause of resentment amid the grinding poverty in the nation.

Uhuru Muigai Kenyatta is the fourth and the current President of Kenya, in office since 9 April 2013. He previously served in the Government of Kenya as Minister for Local Government from 2001 to 2002, and he was leader of the official opposition from 2002 to 2007. Hon. Kenyatta was appointed Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Trade in April 2008. In the same year, he was transferred to the Treasury as Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Finance, as part of the Grand Coalition Cabinet, where he served up to January 2012. He served as the Member of Parliament for Gatundu South Constituency beginning in 2002. President Kenyatta was also the Chairman of Kenya African National Union (KANU), which was a part of the Party of National Unity (PNU). President Uhuru Kenyatta is the first son of founding President Jomo Kenyatta. Born at the dawn of Kenya’s Independence, he carried in his name, Uhuru – which means freedom. President Uhuru Kenyatta attended St Mary’s School in Nairobi and then Amherst College, Massachusetts, United States, where he graduated with a bachelor’s degree in politics and economics. The President has had a long and outstanding career in politics, having served in various capacities in previous administrations heading dockets.

Uhuru Muigai Kenyatta Biography and Profile

Uhuru Muigai Kenyatta (Uhuru Kenyatta), born October 1961, two years before Kenya officially got independence from Britain, his parents named him “Uhuru” — Swahili for freedom — in anticipation of the nation’s liberation from colonial rule. Kenyatta, a member and the party leader of the Jubilee Party of Kenya, is also a businessman, and the fourth and current President of the Republic of Kenya. He served as the Member of Parliament for Gatundu South from 2002 to 2013. At a young age, he brushed shoulders with some of the nation’s prominent figures. His online photo album includes receiving a history award from Mwai Kibaki at a young age, the man he is replacing as president.

Uhuru Muigai Kenyatta brands himself the “digital president”. Uhuru Muigai Kenyatta is Accused of organising attacks on supporters of Raila Odinga after 2007 election. He denied the charges, denounced them as Western plot. Uhuru Muigai Kenyatta, son of the country’s first president, Jomo Kenyatta, is a Heir to one of the largest fortunes in Kenya, according to Forbes magazine.

Uhuru Kenyatta Political Career

Kenyatta dipped into politics as a fierce supporter of the Kenyan African National Union, which ruled the nation from Independence until 2002. After his father’s death, Daniel Arap Moi took over the leadership of the party and the nation. He took the younger Kenyatta under his wing, mentored him and secured him a position in his government. When Moi decided not to run for re-election in 2002, he designated Kenyatta as his candidate of choice. Kenyatta lost to current incumbent president, Kibaki, partly because of his ties to Moi, who was resented for overstaying his welcome as president.

Uhuru Kenyatta is a late comer in the Kenyan politics and was groomed into politics by the retired President Daniel arap Moi who encouraged him to contest Gatundu South Parliamentary seat in 1997 on KANU ticket, which he lost. Despite him losing in the parliamentary elections, Moi nominated him to Parliament, propelled him to Cabinet, and then anointed him as his successor in a move that sparked a bitter fall out in KANU party ahead of 2002 elections.

Kenyatta became known for more than his father’s last name. When Kibaki sought to change the constitution to strengthen the president’s powers, Kenyatta teamed up with then-opposition leader Odinga to rally against the change. In 2005, voters shot down Kibaki’s constitution draft, handing the two rivals a victory. However, the two parted ways before the last election in 2007. Kenyatta, who was not running for office then, threw his weight behind Kibaki, who was up against Odinga. He later served in various positions in Kibaki’s government, including finance minister and his latest role, deputy prime minister.

In retrospect, it appears Kenyatta’s path from childhood may have been preparing him for his new role. His earliest memories revolve around the state house — the nation’s equivalent of the White House — where he scampered down hallways when his father, Jomo Kenyatta, was serving as the nation’s first post-independence president.

As the son of Kenya’s founding father, Jomo Kenyatta, he has always had the name, the wealth and the burden that comes with his heritage. Growing up, the young Kenyatta always shied away from politics, wanting to be seen as an ordinary person at ease with ordinary Kenyans. He went to one of the best schools in Nairobi before attending Amherst College in the US where he studied political science and economics. Mr Kenyatta does not have a natural flair for public speaking but has a powerful voice and can be persuasive when fighting his corner. He has his mother to thank for ensuring that he mastered the local Kikuyu language, which helps him to connect with his countrymen in rural areas.

They love to call him “Kamwana”, which means “young man” – and he made history in 2013 by being sworn in as Kenya’s youngest president.

Former President Daniel Moi had named him as his successor in 2001, a decision that led to rebellion in the ruling party Kanu with top members joining other opposition parties to form the National Rainbow Coalition which won the 2002 election. Mr Kenyatta’s claim to be the digital president was a metaphor for his youth but also a political strategy to reach out to Kenya’s young population and embrace the country’s ambition to become the centre of digital innovation on the continent.

In keeping with his image, he kept his campaign pledge to deliver laptops to primary school children despite some major hiccups. His administration has also launched e-centres – “one-stop shops” to access and pay for government services electronically in order to cut corruption and bureaucracy. Kenyans can now file their taxes and apply for passports, drivers licence, ID cards and access other government services online, cutting hours spent queuing for these services. His administration also set up an online portal to track government projects and another to report corruption directly to him. His critics have said that these initiatives are for show and have not helped bring transparency to his government nor helped fight corruption. Mr Kenyatta boasts very active Facebook and Twitter accounts and has not been shy to join in social media trends. He once famously did a dab dance.

The National Alliance party

After being anointed by former President Moi, Uhuru Muigai Kenyatta made his first bid for the presidency in 2002, which ended unsuccessful. His association with the former president did not work in his favour politically, until he left the former ruling party KANU to launch the The National Alliance party, which sponsored him in the March 2013 general elections, which he won under the Jubilee Alliance, a coalition with the United Republican Party and other small parties.

After Election 2007
The last election stoked deep ethnic rivalries. When Kibaki was declared the winner, Odinga alleged the vote was rigged, sending supporters battling on the streets. The International Criminal Court has indicted Kenyatta for allegedly funding a local militia that conducted reprisal attacks at the time. He has denied the charges, and vowed to cooperate with the court to clear his name. His running mate William Ruto and two others are also indicted. Kenya reneged on a deal to try the perpetrators in local courts, forcing the courts to step in.

Western Quandary
Before the 2013 election, Johnnie Carson, the top American envoy to Africa, warned that “choices have consequences,” widely interpreted as a threat to Kenyans not to vote for him. Carson’s predecessor, Jendayi Frazer, slammed his stance against Kenyatta, describing it as “reckless and irresponsible.”

“Kenyatta knows that he needs the United States, and the United States knows it needs Kenya,” Frazer said. “While it (relations) might be awkward, there won’t be a significant change in our policy stances toward Kenya or theirs toward us.”

In a statement after the election, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry applauded the vote — but did not mention Kenyatta.

“We … will continue to be a strong friend and ally of the Kenyan people,” he said.

Kenyatta has said the indictment will not affect his ability to do his job and urged the international community to respect the will of Kenyans. Analysts say the ICC indictment may have rallied citizens to Kenyatta’s side in defiance of the West. A majority of the court’s investigations are focused on African nations.

“Many Africans have lost faith in ICC and view it as targeting African leaders and failing to discharge its justice among non-African leaders,” Johnson said.

Kenyatta’s trial is scheduled for July, while his running mate’s is in May. Kenya will become the second African nation after Sudan to have a sitting president facing charges at the International Criminal Court.

Digital President

Avid Twitterer Uhuru Kenyatta is no stranger to the limelight. In 2013, Mr Kenyatta crafted a narrative that his main challenger, then and now, Raila Odinga was a project of foreign governments doing the bidding of former colonial powers via the ICC. He called on Kenyans to reject Mr Odinga and assert their sovereignty. This message resonated with his base mostly from the Kikuyu ethnic group and Mr Ruto’s Kalenjin community, leading to the pair’s victory. He also portrayed the older generation of politicians, such as Mr Odinga, now 72, as “analogue” and said they needed to hand over to the young, the “digital generation”. Kenyatta matched his rhetoric with glitz and colour. He was fun, fresh and suave. He was down to earth, approachable and his ardent supporters said he was “demystifying the presidency”.

However, while in power, critics have accused Mr Kenyatta of limiting freedom of expression. His government has passed laws that have been seen as curtailing press freedom. In 2016, a journalist from the Daily Nation, the country’s biggest newspaper, was fired for writing an editorial critical of the president’s economic record. Gaddo, the country’s top cartoonist, was also reportedly sacked for drawing a caricature that showed the president tethered to a ball on chain to depict his ICC troubles. Many were also alarmed when he vowed to “fix” the Supreme Court after it annulled his election victory in August 2017.

Uhuru Kenyatta signs Kenya polygamy law

Kenya’s President Uhuru Kenyatta has signed into law a controversial marriage bill legalising polygamy. It brings civil law, where a man was only allowed one wife, into line with customary law, where some cultures allow multiple partners. Controversy surrounded an amendment to the bill, supported by many male MPs, allowing men to take more wives without consulting existing spouses. Traditionally, first wives are supposed to give prior approval.

Uhuru Kenyatta Education

Kenyatta attended St Mary’s School in Nairobi. Two years after his father died in 1978, Kenyatta joined Amherst College in Massachusetts, United States, where he studied economics and political science.

Uhuru Kenyatta Family

Uhuru Muigai Kenyatta, married to Margaret Wanjiru Gakuo, is the son of Jomo Kenyatta, Kenya’s founding father and the first president of the republic of Kenya (in office 1964–1978), with his fourth wife, Mama Ngina Kenyatta. His family hails from the Kikuyu, a Bantu ethnic group. Children: Jaba Kenyatta, Jomo Kenyatta, Ngina Kenyatta. Siblings: Muhoho Kenyatta, Margaret Kenyatta, Anna Nyokabi.

How Uhuru Kenyatta Met Margaret Wanjiru Gakuo and Got Married
“This is an interesting one. How did I meet the first lady? When I met the first lady, she wasn’t the first lady. She was just another…. wonderful, beautiful girl. Ahhhh… let me say that I first met her brother and we were in secondary school together. We became friends and through him, I managed to meet his younger sister and we started off a relationship that has lasted from high school till now and I’m thankful to God for that,” Margaret Wanjiru Gakuo explained.

Uhuru Kenyatta Height

Uhuru Kenyatta is 1.85 m tall.

Uhuru Kenyatta Net Worth

Uhuru Kenyatta is ranked by Forbes Magazine as the 26th richest person in Africa, with an estimated fortune of $500m (£320m). They own huge parcels of land in the Rift Valley, central and coastal regions of Kenya. Uhuru Kenyatta owns at least 500,000 acres of prime land spread across the country. The land was acquired by his father in the 1960s and 1970s when the British colonial government and the World Bank funded a settlement transfer fund scheme that enabled government officials and wealthy Kenyans to acquire land from the British at very low prices. Uhuru and his family also own Brookside Dairies, Kenya’s largest dairy company, as well as stakes in popular television station K24 and a commercial bank in Nairobi, among other interests. His family owns TV channel K24, The People newspaper and a number of radio stations, as well as vast interests in the country’s tourism, banking, construction, dairy and insurance sectors.

Uhuru Muigai Kenyatta Biography and Profile

The (NEW!) Goodreadbiography Channel on YouTube!
Go now to Goodreadbiography.com (NEW!) Channel on YouTube. Listen to your favourites Famous People Biographies, Facts, Accomplishments, Books and Memoirs anywhere, including on the go. SUBSCRIBE for the latest notable people biographies. Enjoy listening!

Thank you for visiting Goodreadbiography.com. Show your strong support.
+ Share this content with friends or Discuss this biography
+ Submit or suggest famous biographies.
+ Report errors or incorrect facts.

NEWSLETTER: Subscribe For Content Like This And More.

Got Comment?